Welcoming our new WILD Manager, Sky Kili - and also, thank you to King Conservation District

Welcoming our new WILD Program Manager, Sky Kili – and also, thank you to King Conservation District

InterIm CDA would like to welcome our new WILD Program Manager, Sky Kili. Sky has a background in sustainability, community organizing, and youth development. We want to thank Malika Aiyer, who worked as our Program Manager for one year and was with the program for a year and a half. Malika oversaw several successful projects with the WILD program, which included developing our Seed to Plate curriculum with the youth and outdoor experience programming.

We also want to thank the King Conservation District (KCD) for their continued support of the WILD program and our Danny Woo Community Garden. Their support has and will continue to provide the resources to create more significant food equity and food access in the CID and provide greater development opportunities to disadvantaged youth. KCD’s support has allowed youth participants to gain leadership skills and a greater understanding of sustainability. Here are photos of our WILD youth and elders from the community teaming up to prepare culturally relevant foods together.


Photos of the 47th annual pig roast in the Danny Woo Garden in July 2023

Thank you to all who joined us at the annual pig roast last month! And huge thanks to those who provided financial support and donated food and time, including our pig roast sponsor Enterprise Community Partners, our gardeners and community members, Tai Tung, Fort St. George, Uwajimaya,  and Starbucks. And very big thank you to our garden staff, KaeLi Deng and Kathryn Tehl for all their work on the event!

Volunteers picked up food donations from around the CID neighborhood. Photo credit: Huilan Huang.

 

Here are some of the delicious food donations! Photo credit: Huilan Huang.

 

Asian Pacific Islander Coalition Advocating Together for Health (APICAT) volunteered to help set up for the event. Photo credit: Lynette Seigafo.

 

More youth engaged as volunteers with senior gardeners to host the pig roast. Photo credit: Lynette Seigafo.

 

The pig was roasted in the pig roast pit by volunteers who take shifts from Friday evening all night long through Saturday morning turning the pig. Photo credit: InterIm CDA

 

Long time pig roast volunteer Marcus preps the fully roasted pig for the potluck on Saturday. Photo credit: InterIm CDA.

 

People gathered on Friday to enjoy food, games and catching up with one another in the garden. Photo credit: InterIm CDA.

 

On Saturday, gardeners enjoyed a potluck lunch including the roasted pig. Photo credit: InterIm CDA

 


47th Annual Pig Roast

On Friday, July 21st and Saturday, July 22nd, we hosted our 47th Annual Pig Roast. BIG Thank you to everyone who attended, our volunteers, sponsors, donors, gardeners, and staff for participating. It was a great event getting the community together for yummy food, games, stories, and roasting the pig all night.
Please view a short clip by Natasha Mozgovaya, thank you!


Department of Neighborhoods Food Equity Fund grants InterIm CDA Danny Woo Garden and WILD $100,000

Department of Neighborhoods Food Equity Fund grants InterIm CDA Danny Woo Garden and WILD $100,000

Seattle – The City of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods (DON) has awarded the Danny Woo Garden in Chinatown-International District (CID) and the Wilderness Inner-City Leadership program $100,000 through the Food Equity Fund to support intergenerational learning programs and infrastructure upgrades and repairs that will support community needs in the garden. The Food Equity Fund is a DON program whose purpose is to invest in community-led work that contributes to an equitable and sustainable local food system.

Specifically, this funding will support operations in the Danny Woo Garden in the following ways:

  1. Provide equitable and culturally specific food sources in the Danny Woo Garden for low-income, immigrant, refugee, Asian, and Pacific Islander elders in the CID;
  2. Provide intergenerational information sharing and learning between elders and API youth about food systems, food justice, and food security through the garden to maintain cultural and ethnic food traditions;
  3. Provide funds for infrastructure repairs to maintain sustainable food systems in the garden.

The Danny Woo Garden was created through community activism in 1975 and since then has been a vital source of food security and of maintaining culturally appropriate sources of food for low-income, immigrant, refugee, Asian, and Pacific Islander elders in the CID. Currently, 66 elderly residents utilize close to 100 plots in the 1.5-acre community garden. Over the years, the Danny Woo Garden has fed hundreds of elders. It has also improved their physical and mental health by providing space to be physically and socially active.

Funding will support programs that bring elders and youth together to learn about seed-to-plate practices, culturally specific recipes based on what gardeners have grown, the physical health value of maintaining a healthy diet of ethnic produce, and more. InterIm CDA’s youth program, Wilderness Inner-city Leadership Development (WILD), engages 40-100 low-income API teens ages 14-19 in year-round programming, and the Danny Woo Garden provides a live outdoor classroom for WILD programming that supports two tenets of WILD youth programming: Building intergenerational relationships between API immigrant elders and youth; and learning the value of an organic, culturally relevant garden’s place in a low-income BIPOC community food system. 

Time spent together in the garden among elders and youth creates conversations and experiential information-sharing among generations around concepts of food justice in low-income immigrant and refugee populated communities. Youth gain a holistic understanding of how critical it is for underserved, immigrant communities and individuals to grow what they eat and have access to healthy, organic, culturally relevant, sustainably grown produce.

“Our vision for food equity and sustainability is to honor what our CID community of immigrants and refugees has given up when they’ve left their home countries, usually out of necessity, by giving them space to hold onto their cultural food practices,” said Pradeepta Upadhyay, Executive Director of InterIm CDA. “We also want to ensure this knowledge is passed down to younger generations. We want these culturally unique ties to the land and growing practices to continue here in the CID. This is why we’ve created infrastructure in the garden to support a learning environment for youth.”

Funding will also support much needed infrastructure repairs and ongoing maintenance in the culturally and ethnically responsive garden including for the pig roast pit, chicken coop, one toolshed, the outdoor cookery, maintaining a seed library to offer free seeds to the CID community and garden visitors, cisterns, a boardwalk that allows access to the garden plots, flower beds, and fences and handrails necessary for safety of the elders.

“The garden gave the land back to the old folks who left it in the old country to strike it rich here. They never realized how much they missed the earth,” wrote Bob Santos in his memoir, Humbows Not Hotdogs, about seeing how the creation of the Danny Woo Garden gave back to the elders in the CID and how much they’ve used the garden. This funding helps support this legacy in the CID.

For more information on all awardees, see the DON press release.

Contact: jwasberg@interimcda.org

 


47th Annual Pig Roast Volunteer Recruitment

47th Annual Pig Roast: July 21 and 22

Summertime’s in the air – and in the CID! Which means the pig roast is coming up! Join us on July 21 and 22 for the 47th annual pig roast. Volunteer registration for the pig roast is now live; see shifts here. We roast the pig all night long Friday into Saturday morning will be in need of help all 24 hours. Contact volunteer@interimcda.org for more information. And come one come all for the Friday community gathering with food and drinks and enjoying the garden. We can’t wait to see you and catch up with you all!

Special thanks to Enterprise Community Housing for their support of the pig roast!


Connecting with Community Dinner

Join InterIm CDA for an evening to connect with our community. Please come share a delicious multi-course meal with new and old friends hearing stories of activism in the CID

Hi, friends! Well, it’s been a while (three years!), but the time has finally come for us to get together in person, share food together and be with one another. We can’t wait to see you. InterIm CDA’s annual community dinner is a chance for us to catch up, learn about Uncle Bob’s Place and other things InterIm CDA has been doing and to celebrate our strong history of activism in the community. We’ll keep the stage program short and the social time long since we know we’ve all got a lot of catching up to do with one another!

Joyale Seafood Restaurant: 900 S Jackson St, Seattle, WA 98104
Date: Friday, November 3, 2023
Time: 5:00 PM
Tickets: $100 (check back for ticket sales link later this spring)
RSVP by October 16, 2023 to Lynette Seigafo at lseigafo@interimcda.org


Coalition of CID partners celebrates approval of north and south stations as preferred alternative, reducing risk of community displacement

PRESS RELEASE                                                                              For immediate release
Thursday, March 23, 2023

PRESS CONTACTS:
Christina Shimizu, Executive Director, Puget Sound Sage, 206-552-5508, chrissy@pugetsoundsage.org
Derek Lum, Advocacy and Policy Manager, InterImCDA, dlum@interimcda.org
Nina Wallace, CID Coalition, 360-305-0160, cidnohotel@gmail.com

Coalition of CID partners celebrates approval of north and south stations as preferred alternative, reducing risk of community displacement

WHAT: The Sound Transit board has approved the north and south stations for the West Seattle and Ballard Link Extensions (WSBLE) project that Coalition of CID partners have advocated for.

Chinatown International District, Seattle, King County –

After a long and difficult fight to choose a preferred alternative, the Chinatown International District (CID) Coalition, Puget Sound Sage and InterImCDA are celebrating a major victory for securing the future growth and development of the CID neighborhood to be equitable, affordable, and a sustainable place for immigrants and working class communities of color to live and thrive for generations to come.

The coalition’s fight for a station location is rooted in the vision to maximize opportunity for equitable transit-oriented development, provide great transit options, stop the acceleration of gentrification, and for the survival of a community that has struggled for decades from racist policies and land grabbing encroachment. This decision is a critical step in acknowledging and repairing past harms.

“We extend our sincere appreciation to the Sound Transit board and staff, including Mayor Harrell, Executive Constantine and Council President Juarez for supporting north and south. We want to especially thank Councilmember Tammy Morales, for hearing our voices and concerns and being a vocal advocate against displacement and for inclusive transit oriented development,” said Christina Shimizu, Executive Director of Puget Sound Sage. “We are grateful for their willingness to listen and recognize the importance of our long-standing history and the need for access to regionally connected transit, affordable housing, and opportunities for culturally relevant equitable transit oriented development (eTOD) that do not accelerate gentrification pressures in the neighborhood.”

The CID Coalition, InterIm CDA, and Puget Sound Sage are committed to fighting speculative corporate development and displacement, and to ensuring that communities of color are centered in decision-making around transit and land use. “Good planning means something different for different communities,” Shimizu added. “A truly equitable and inclusive urbanism, and density done right, requires policymakers to listen to communities of color and trust that we know what is best for our neighborhoods.”

“InterIm CDA has been a community based organization serving the needs of the CID for 53 years,” said InterIm CDA Executive Director Pradeepta Upadhyay. “We endorsed the north and south station locations option after weighing the significant impacts on the CID and its property owners, businesses, community organizations, and residents. Based on our values, we believe this is the best option for the community. We thank the Sound Transit board for making the right choice, and look forward to working with the community and Sound Transit to make these options the best they can be for the CID.”

While the CID Coalition, Puget Sound Sage and InterIm CDA are celebrating this victory, they are also aware that their work is not done. The coalition plans to stay engaged and organized to ensure that the community benefits the most from the station: pedestrian improvements for walking and rolling, lighting, and wayfinding among other community benefits and mitigation connected to the light rail line as well as righting past harms. They will also advocate for a platform to connect Sounder to the South of CID station, expanded greenspace and protections for City Hall park, and access to culturally relevant, community based eTOD to provide much-needed affordable housing for the neighborhood.

“This win is only one step to repairing the harm and distrust in our communities, and the destruction that previous infrastructure projects have wrought on the CID,” said Monyee Chau of the CID Coalition. “The copious amount of labor that organizers have put in to protect our neighborhood is a testament to how deeply we all care for this community, and I have so much gratitude for everyone who helped us fight for this win. May we continue to make these conversations more accessible and inclusive of all the people that they affect, and move forward with collaboration and a commitment to ensuring that the Chinatown International District community remains a vibrant and thriving part of Seattle.”

About the CID Coalition:

The Chinatown International District Coalition is a grassroots, multiracial, multiethnic and multigenerational organization that works to promote social, economic, and environmental justice for low-income communities of color in the CID and Greater Seattle. They fight against displacement, gentrification, and the erasure of community history and culture.

About Puget Sound Sage:

Puget Sound Sage charts a path to a living economy in the South Salish Sea and Duwamish River Valley (greater Seattle) regions by developing community power to influence, lead, and govern.  We ground our policies in grassroots organizing & community-based research with people directly impacted by systems of oppression and organizations serving BIPOC workers, their families and communities.  Through the power of grassroots organizing, policy and advocacy strategies, and leveraging the influence of coalitions centering impacted communities, we have organized for and passed some of our region’s most exciting policies that promote climate justice, good jobs and equitable development in low-wage and people of color communities. Our campaigns and theory of change are rooted in intersectional economic & racial justice, which for us means organizing historically disenfranchised people and bringing them together to build power as a vehicle for social change.

About InterIm CDA:

InterIm CDA was created in 1969 and is a nonprofit affordable housing and community development organization based in Seattle’s Chinatown/International District (CID). Since 1969 InterIm CDA (ICDA) provides multilingual, culturally competent housing and community building services to those disenfranchised due to lack of English, low acculturation and poverty. Though historically ICDA’s focus was on the API community living in the CID, they currently serve about 5,000 unduplicated low-income limited English speaking individuals from Asia, Africa and America throughout the greater Puget Sound.

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Seedling giveaway for the community today March 23 at Danny Woo Garden

Hope you can join us today for our community seed giveaway! Spring is here! See you at the Danny Woo Garden today at 1.


WILD Spring 2023: REGISTER NOW!

WILD Spring 2023 quarter is now open for registration!

Know a teen who wants to connect with their API culture and people in the CID, build their leadership skills, learn about environmental and food justice and earn a stipend or school service hours while doing so? Contact Malika Aiyer, InterIm WILD program manager to learn about the upcoming spring quarter and how to register to participate! Contact: maiyer@interimcda.org. Learn more about WILD on our website. [https://interimcda.org/wild/]. Get more details on spring quarter activities (arts projects, environmental justice/climate change, seed-to-plate activities in the Danny Woo Garden, adulting) in the flyers below:


InterIm CDA Statement for Light Rail

InterIm CDA statement of support for North and South station locations for light rail expansion

 

Sound Transit has proposed four options for a new light rail station to serve Chinatown-International District (CID). No matter the option, there will be massive impacts on the neighborhood affecting businesses, residents and all who utilize, visit, work and live in the CID. The options include the following:

 

1. A station on 4th avenue south near Union Station

2. A station on 4th avenue near the King County administration building “North Station”

3. A station on 6th avenue south near the INS building “South Station”

4. A combination of both options #2 and #3 “North and South options”

 

InterIm CDA statement of support for North and South station locations for light rail expansion

ATTN: Julie Timm

401 S Jackson Street

Seattle, WA 98104

 

Dear CEO Timm, Board Chair Constantine, and other leaders,

Sound Transit is currently working on a proposal that will significantly impact our CID community for 100 years. We were appalled by the way in which both the original 4th and 5th avenue options did not adequately address the displacement pressures in our community that will be generated over time from the new light rail line. Significant amounts of displacement pressures are inherent to light rail expansions. These options added to the burden through significant traffic disruptions, road closures, and dust from construction impacts. In the case of 4th Ave. South, roughly 9 to 11 years of impacts will surely harm property owners, businesses, community organizations, and residents. Some people will be displaced from the community because of these construction impacts. Our values lead us to write our DEIS letter with a focus on physical, economic, and cultural displacement, along with other concerns for the health, safety, and well-being of the community members we serve. When the North and South station options were revealed, we were intrigued based on our values and the topics above.

We saw the potential for these new station locations to remove damage to the CID compared to the 4th avenue station location. The potential TOD development opportunities could also help push back against displacement pressures in the area and possibly provide affordable housing in a community where many are either living in lower quality housing or simply locked out of the opportunity to live near the CID due to cost. However, we still had questions for Sound Transit staff about various details of these options and the process overall. After our discussion with Sound Transit staff, we have come to this conclusion.

InterIm CDA supports the Sound Transit board in choosing the North and South station locations to serve our CID community. We are making this choice because, based on our values, we believe this is the best option for the community.

· This combination maintains regional connectivity to all three Sound Transit lines, allowing CID community members to utilize the 1, 2, or 3 lines.

· This combination keeps the stations accessible to and serving the CID, providing access to light rail for community members.

· This combination makes construction duration significantly shorter with significantly less potential impact due to distance. This will harm fewer residents, businesses, property owners, and community organizations and help reduce one specific avenue for displacement.

· This combination allows for a significant opportunity for equitable transit-oriented development and open space, benefits direly needed that could be utilized by the CID community.

These options have the potential to reduce significant harm to CID. In combination with the equitable transit-oriented development opportunities, these new options significantly impact addressing displacement in the CID related to this project.

This does not eliminate our overall concern about physical, economic, and cultural displacement related to any light rail project in proximity to the CID or in addressing past harms committed to the community. Many other details still need to be addressed to make these stations optimal for the community. Sound transit must act on the fact that it is working in a community at high risk for displacement and its own racial equity commitments. We still believe that even if the North and South station locations are chosen, there still needs to be a strong mitigation and community benefits discussion which, amongst other items, implements a Community Based Affordable Housing and Affordable Commercial Space Framework.

We look forward to the next phase of the West Seattle to Ballard Link Extension project and are proud of the community for making its voice heard. Sound Transit must reduce harm while still providing transit benefits. Regardless of the station location chosen, we will continue to work with the community and Sound Transit, along with other government stakeholders, to produce the best outcome for the community.

 

InterIm CDA